Archived Saskatoon Events

These Saskatoon events have been archived based on an expiry date set by the originator. Please note that these events are only presented for interest – to give volunteers, nonprofit organizations, and site visitors an opportunity to see the types of events occurring in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.
[et_pb_row admin_label="Row" make_fullwidth="on" use_custom_width="on" width_unit="off" use_custom_gutter="off" padding_mobile="off" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" make_equal="off" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="off" parallax_2="off" parallax_method_2="off" column_padding_mobile="on" custom_width_percent="100%" custom_css_main_element="width: 100% !important;"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

Delving into the Heart of the Forest (Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.)

Category: Meetings, Conferences and Workshops
Dates: September 26, 2021 - September 26, 2021

Zoom Virtual Online Webinar. Seeing, and orienting towards a holistic experience, tapping into intuition, exploring how forests think, asking the question, "Our Forests. Are they alive?"

Sylvan dreaming and knowing, the secret life of trees, and forests. Multiple ways to connect and discover ecological non-dualism with revelations by speakers: Charles Eisenstein public speaker and author, Eduardo Kohn is Associate Professor of Anthropology at McGill University, Geneen Marie Haugen, Sadghuru, Suzanne Simard professor in the Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences, Arts and Wildwoods. Immersing in the exploratory steps of semiosis, ecological ethics and cosmic diplomacy. Discovering the heart and soul of the forest. Richard St. Barbe Baker had a mission to develop a" tree sense" in every citizen, and to encourage all to plant, protect and love their native trees.

"I approach God's Creation, this beautiful Earth. The ancients believed that the Earth was a sentient being and felt the behaviour of mankind upon it." said Richard St. Barbe Baker, " As we have no proof to the contrary, it might be as well for responsible people to accept this point of view and behave accordingly.

This program for National Forest Week is brought to you by the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas an environmental non-profit charity that was created to preserve and restore the 326-acre Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and the 148-acre George Genereux Urban Regional Park. Our work reinforces the 1979 City Council decision designating these afforestation areas on the western fringe of Saskatoon to “be preserved in perpetuity.” They are important habitat for wildlife as well as semi-wild public spaces for recreation and nature immersion. The larger of these two areas is named after Richard St. Barbe Baker (1889-1982), who has been called the “first global conservationist” and in recognition of this he was made the first Honorary Life Member of the World Wildlife Fund in 1969. A British forester who also homesteaded and studied in Saskatoon, he dedicated his entire life unfailingly to the preservation and planting of trees and forests.

The Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas are proud to bring to you this series of events for National Forest Week Theme "Our forests - Continually giving" Saturday September 18, 2021 to Sunday September 26, 2021 Maple Leaf Day September 22, 2021

This is one session in a week long series of events celebrating National Forest Week with a theme – “Our Forests – Continually Giving”

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" make_fullwidth="on" use_custom_width="on" width_unit="off" use_custom_gutter="off" padding_mobile="off" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" make_equal="off" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="off" parallax_2="off" parallax_method_2="off" column_padding_mobile="on" custom_width_percent="100%" custom_css_main_element="width: 100% !important;"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

Forest Connections and guided walk (Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.)

Category: Meetings, Conferences and Workshops
Dates: September 26, 2021 - September 26, 2021

A snapshot of nature in time to document how healthy the environment is.
Live In person event
Discovering an alliance and affiliation with nature. Taking photos through the iNaturalist app on the smartphone, to immerse an outdoor, nature-loving invigorating afternoon. An idyllic way to find a connection in the forest, to see the liason and relation between trees and understorey, to find the kinship between in this semi-wilderness area, and explore nature’s forest habitat. Experience a care-free healthful, informal nature relationship.

Sunday Sep 26, 2021 at 2:00 pm Nature Connect Bio-Blitz and Forest Walk meet at Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area GPS 52.1052.108851 -106.789851 SW OLRA Just in time for World Environmental Health Day, check out the forest health today.

Download the iNaturalist app on your smart phone and sign in before coming out!

This program for National Forest Week is brought to you by the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas an environmental non-profit charity that was created to preserve and restore the 326-acre Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and the 148-acre George Genereux Urban Regional Park. Our work reinforces the 1972 City Council decision designating these afforestation areas on the western fringe of Saskatoon to “be preserved in perpetuity.” They are important habitat for wildlife as well as semi-wild public spaces for recreation and nature immersion. The larger of these two areas is named after Richard St. Barbe Baker (1889-1982), who has been called the “first global conservationist” and in recognition of this he was made the first Honorary Life Member of the World Wildlife Fund in 1969. A British forester who also homesteaded and studied in Saskatoon, he dedicated his entire life unfailingly to the preservation and planting of trees and forests.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" make_fullwidth="on" use_custom_width="on" width_unit="off" use_custom_gutter="off" padding_mobile="off" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" make_equal="off" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="off" parallax_2="off" parallax_method_2="off" column_padding_mobile="on" custom_width_percent="100%" custom_css_main_element="width: 100% !important;"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

PaRx has officially arrived in Saskatchewan! (Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.)

Category: Meetings, Conferences and Workshops
Dates: September 25, 2021 - September 25, 2021

Zoom Virtual Online Event PaRx, Canada's first national nature prescription program, has officially arrived in Saskatchewan!

PaRx is an initiative of the BC Parks Foundation, driven by health-care professionals who want to improve their patients’ health by connecting them to nature. Featuring practical resources like quick tips and patient handouts, its goal is to make prescribing time in nature simple, fun and effective. Research suggests that spending time in green space boosts immune function and life expectancy, and lowers the risk of developing a host of medical conditions from heart disease to diabetes, obesity, depression and anxiety. Not only that, but people who are more connected to nature are more likely to protect it. With guest speakers Dr. Melissa Lem, Director of PaRx, as well as University of Saskatchewan medical students Brooklyn Rawlyk and Sehjal Bhargava

The non-profit charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. was created to preserve and restore the 326-acre Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (RSBBAA) and the 148-acre George Genereux Urban Regional Park. Our work reinforces the 1972 City Council decision designating these afforestation areas on the western fringe of Saskatoon to “be preserved in perpetuity.”

The word recreation can be understood re-creation, reflecting the fact that being in nature is restorative for human beings. Richard St. Barbe Baker wandered into the forest near his home at age five and experienced the overwhelming beauty of nature touch his soul.

“Soon I was completely isolated in the luxuriant, tangled growth of ferns which were well above my head. In my infant mind I seemed to have entered a fairyland of my dreams. I wandered on as in a dream, all sense of time and space lost … I became intoxicated with the beauty all around me, immersed in the joyousness and exultation of feeling part of it all. I had entered the temple of the wood. I sank to the ground in a state of ecstasy; everything was intensely vivid – the call of a distant cuckoo seemed just for me … The overpowering beauty of it all entered my very being. At that moment my heart brimmed over with a sense of unspeakable thankfulness which has followed me through the years since that woodland re-birth.”

St Barbe had a life-long feeling of oneness with nature after this and this spiritual connection inspired his great achievements to protect and restore forests. He taught that trees and woodlands are intimately linked with biological, social, emotional, and spiritual well-being. In this light, he often quoted the poet Stanton Coblentz who wrote about the redwood forests “ I think but could the weary world but know communion with these spirits breathing peace, strangely a veil would lift, a light would glow, and the dark tumult of our lives would cease.”

This program for National Forest Week is brought to you by the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas an environmental non-profit charity that was created to preserve and restore the 326-acre Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and the 148-acre George Genereux Urban Regional Park. Our work reinforces the 1979 City Council decision designating these afforestation areas on the western fringe of Saskatoon to “be preserved in perpetuity.” They are important habitat for wildlife as well as semi-wild public spaces for recreation and nature immersion. The larger of these two areas is named after Richard St. Barbe Baker (1889-1982), who has been called the “first global conservationist” and in recognition of this he was made the first Honorary Life Member of the World Wildlife Fund in 1969. A British forester who also homesteaded and studied in Saskatoon, he dedicated his entire life unfailingly to the preservation and planting of trees and forests.

Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas are proud to bring to you this series of events for National Forest Week Theme "Our forests - Continually giving" Saturday September 18, 2021 to Sunday September 26, 2021 Commemorating and celebrating Maple Leaf Day September 22, 2021

This is one session in a week long series of events celebrating National Forest Week with a theme – “Our Forests – Continually Giving”

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" make_fullwidth="on" use_custom_width="on" width_unit="off" use_custom_gutter="off" padding_mobile="off" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" make_equal="off" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="off" parallax_2="off" parallax_method_2="off" column_padding_mobile="on" custom_width_percent="100%" custom_css_main_element="width: 100% !important;"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

When and Where did you see What? (Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.)

Category: Meetings, Conferences and Workshops
Dates: September 24, 2021 - September 24, 2021

Online Zoom Webinar. Three steps to get started in saving and conserving species. How these tips and tricks made me a better Naturalist

Discover the many benefits getting started in saving species with artificial intelligence. Basic techniques that work for everyone. Interesting facts and sure - fire ways to help you succeed. Now you can have the immersion in nature based solutions to climate change faster than you ever imagined. Incredibly easy method to have artificial intelligence work for all! Biodiversity photos => Data. It is as easy as snap, share, identify. Could this webinar be the definitive answer to taking part in the "big picture?" We all share and co-exist on this planet. How to change the world - participation is worth it.

This Introduction to iNaturalist workshop builds on the iNaturalist presentation to Master Naturalists - entitled "When and Where did you See What?" by Sam Kieschnick iNaturalist curator and Urban Wildlife Biologist, "An intro to iNaturalist" by cassi saari a field biologist, ecological restoration practitioner and iNaturalist curator and Patrick McCrea a wildlife ecologist along with "A brief orientation to iNaturalist" by Carrie Seltzer, PhD in ecology staff member for the iNaturalist communication network. The workshop assists with getting involved with identifications on iNaturalist, taking observations to the next level and not to worry about being self conscious or anxious about your observations, and welcoming users. We would really like to impress the group with the community aspect of how iNaturalist comes together.

It is great fun to use iNaturalist, and get engaged with an amazing group of naturalists online, and meet some of them in-person! This is a great social network connection for anyone who enjoys and appreciates nature. iNaturalist is a great way to create field guides, and have a readily available calendar to refer to. As you wander and explore the great out of doors, often times you may have stopped to wonder what that was? The iNaturalist is a tool that can assist you to learn and answer this very question and discover the answer to "What is that, anyways?"

This program for National Forest Week is brought to you by the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas an environmental non-profit charity that was created to preserve and restore the 326-acre Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and the 148-acre George Genereux Urban Regional Park. Our work reinforces the 1972 City Council decision designating these afforestation areas on the western fringe of Saskatoon to “be preserved in perpetuity.” They are important habitat for wildlife as well as semi-wild public spaces for recreation and nature immersion. The larger of these two areas is named after Richard St. Barbe Baker (1889-1982), who has been called the “first global conservationist” and in recognition of this he was made the first Honorary Life Member of the World Wildlife Fund in 1969. A British forester who also homesteaded and studied in Saskatoon, he dedicated his entire life unfailingly to the preservation and planting of trees and forests.

Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas are proud to bring to you this series of events for National Forest Week Theme "Our forests - Continually giving" Saturday September 18, 2021 to Sunday September 26, 2021 Maple Leaf Day September 22, 2021 This is one session in a weeklong series of webinars.

This is one session in a week long series of events celebrating National Forest Week with a theme – “Our Forests – Continually Giving”

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" make_fullwidth="on" use_custom_width="on" width_unit="off" use_custom_gutter="off" padding_mobile="off" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" make_equal="off" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="off" parallax_2="off" parallax_method_2="off" column_padding_mobile="on" custom_width_percent="100%" custom_css_main_element="width: 100% !important;"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

Urban forests and greenspaces enhance Saskatoon’s quality of life. (Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.)

Category: Meetings, Conferences and Workshops
Dates: September 23, 2021 - September 23, 2021

Urban forests and green infrastructure in a Changing Climate

With guest speakers from City of Saskatoon urban forestry and YXE Green Infrastruture Strategy.

This virtual session presents highlights from City of Saskatoon's urban forestry department a very vital player to hear from during National Forest Week.

This session will also present the research conducted for the new YXE Green Infrastructure Strategy and how it will benefit the city and its residents

The Strategy outlines 5 programs to be carried out over the next 10 years, which include:

1. Natural Areas: a program to protect, restore, and manage natural areas in the Green Network

2. Grey to Green: a program to increase green infrastructure in urban areas

3. Engaging Community with the Green Network through volunteer opportunities and education

4. Sustainable Food: Supporting local, sustainable, and equitable food in Saskatoon

5. Connecting the Green Network between natural and urban areas.

The current focus is implementation of the Green Infrastructure Strategy and how to improve green infrastructure in Saskatoon.

Urban Forestry and YXE Green Infrastructure Sustainability will have representatives speaking during this session about urban forests, YXC Green Infrastructure Strategy and the City of Saskatoon's celebration of National Forest Week - this year's theme “Our Forests, Continually Giving.”

This program for National Forest Week is brought to you by the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas an environmental non-profit charity that was created to preserve and restore the 326-acre Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and the 148-acre George Genereux Urban Regional Park. Our work reinforces the 1972 City Council decision designating these afforestation areas on the western fringe of Saskatoon to “be preserved in perpetuity.” They are important habitat for wildlife as well as semi-wild public spaces for recreation and nature immersion. The larger of these two areas is named after Richard St. Barbe Baker (1889-1982), who has been called the “first global conservationist” and in recognition of this he was made the first Honorary Life Member of the World Wildlife Fund in 1969. A British forester who also homesteaded and studied in Saskatoon, he dedicated his entire life unfailingly to the preservation and planting of trees and forests.

Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas are proud to bring to you this series of events for National Forest Week the Theme of this week is "Our forests - Continually giving" taking place Saturday September 18, 2021 to Sunday September 26, 2021 This week also is commemorating and celebrating Maple Leaf Day September 22, 2021

This is one session in a week long series of events celebrating National Forest Week with a theme – “Our Forests – Continually Giving”

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" make_fullwidth="on" use_custom_width="on" width_unit="off" use_custom_gutter="off" padding_mobile="off" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" make_equal="off" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="off" parallax_2="off" parallax_method_2="off" column_padding_mobile="on" custom_width_percent="100%" custom_css_main_element="width: 100% !important;"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

Reconciliation through Healing Forests (Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.)

Category: Meetings, Conferences and Workshops
Dates: September 22, 2021 - September 22, 2021

National Healing Forests Online Zoom Webinar. Imagine woodlands setting(s) for health, wellness, understanding, and respect across cultures.

A forest can help people heal and connect them with nature. With this in mind, Peter Croal (retired CIDA Environment Specialist) and Patricia Stirbys (legal and Indigenous Relations specialist) – inspired by the 2015 Truth and Reconciliation Commission report and its Calls to Action to strengthen relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples – developed the National Healing Forests initiative. A Healing Forest project brings together Indigenous and non-Indigenous neighbours to plan and develop green spaces where survivors and families of the Residential School legacy, as well as all Canadians, can heal, do ceremony, reflect, discuss and meditate. This reconciliation project is community-led and totally grassroots.

This presentation outlines a brief history of the residential school system and explains how communities and institutions can create their own Healing Forest space for reconciliation.

We are grateful for this presentation by Patricia Stirbys (Indigenous relations specialist) and Peter Croal (P. Geol. International Environment and Development Advisor), co-founders of the National Healing Forests initiative.

This virtual connection provides a time to learn more about the National Healing Forests in this era of Truth and Reconciliation.

This program for National Forest Week is brought to you by the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas an environmental non-profit charity that was created to preserve and restore the 326-acre Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and the 148-acre George Genereux Urban Regional Park. Our work reinforces the 1972 City Council decision designating these afforestation areas on the western fringe of Saskatoon to “be preserved in perpetuity.” They are important habitat for wildlife as well as semi-wild public spaces for recreation and nature immersion. The larger of these two areas is named after Richard St. Barbe Baker (1889-1982), who has been called the “first global conservationist” and in recognition of this he was made the first Honorary Life Member of the World Wildlife Fund in 1969. A British forester who also homesteaded and studied in Saskatoon, he dedicated his entire life unfailingly to the preservation and planting of trees and forests.

Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas are proud to bring to you this series of events for National Forest Week Theme "Our forests - Continually giving" Saturday September 18, 2021 to Sunday September 26, 2021 Commemorating and celebrating Maple Leaf Day September 22, 2021

This is one session in a week long series of events celebrating National Forest Week with a theme – “Our Forests – Continually Giving”

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" make_fullwidth="on" use_custom_width="on" width_unit="off" use_custom_gutter="off" padding_mobile="off" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" make_equal="off" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="off" parallax_2="off" parallax_method_2="off" column_padding_mobile="on" custom_width_percent="100%" custom_css_main_element="width: 100% !important;"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

how does this free tool give value to farmers and the potential for cash in pocket? (Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.)

Category: Meetings, Conferences and Workshops
Dates: September 21, 2021 - September 21, 2021

The Shelterbelt Decision Support System [SB-DSS] Virtual Online Zoom Webinar “in its latest climate change action plan, the Saskatchewan government is proposing to pay farmers for storing carbon, not just charging agricultural producers for emitting carbon into the atmosphere, “ reports U of S News. Dr. Colin Laroque from the University of Saskatchewan will present information about this free app - a tool for Saskatchewan farmers - to place a cash value on sustainable shelterbelts. The Free app is the Shelterbelt Decision Support System [SB - DSS] calculates the carbon offset value of shelterbelts, and isn't that a fantastic way for farmers to know what their shelterbelt is worth under the $50 per tonne CO2E tax expected to roll out in 2022. This app is invaluable, as it also helps to suggest the best types of trees depending on the location in the province along with planting guidelines. Not only will farmers reap the environmental benefits, they can see the carbon offset value for the carbon pricing system.

" if you devote 22% of a quarter section, that's 160 acres, to trees, you can double the crops.' It's a question of planting trees strategically. The trees reduce the speed of the wind, modify the climate, they modify the difference in temperature from day and night, and above all the trees make it possible for the earthworms to come into the land, and the earthworm casts its own weight every 24 hours. And a well-populated acre of worms casts 30 tonnes of worm castings per acre per year. That's equal to 30 tonnes of farmyard manure on that land." Richard St. Barbe Baker who also explains , that “We’re stabilizing the sand with a series of spiral shelters – rows of trees planted in semicircles to catch the winds and create vortices of air. The same thing would be valuable on the Canadian prairies where straight shelter belts cause snow to accumulate.”

This program for National Forest Week is brought to you by the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas an environmental non-profit charity that was created to preserve and restore the 326-acre Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and the 148-acre George Genereux Urban Regional Park. Our work reinforces the 1972 City Council decision designating these afforestation areas on the western fringe of Saskatoon to “be preserved in perpetuity.” They are important habitat for wildlife as well as semi-wild public spaces for recreation and nature immersion. The larger of these two areas is named after Richard St. Barbe Baker (1889-1982), who has been called the “first global conservationist” and in recognition of this he was made the first Honorary Life Member of the World Wildlife Fund in 1969. A British forester who also homesteaded and studied in Saskatoon, he dedicated his entire life unfailingly to the preservation and planting of trees and forests.

This is one session in a week long series of events celebrating National Forest Week with a theme – “Our Forests – Continually Giving”

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" make_fullwidth="on" use_custom_width="on" width_unit="off" use_custom_gutter="off" padding_mobile="off" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" make_equal="off" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="off" parallax_2="off" parallax_method_2="off" column_padding_mobile="on" custom_width_percent="100%" custom_css_main_element="width: 100% !important;"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

Flag Raising Ceremony | National Forest Week (Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.)

Category: Meetings, Conferences and Workshops
Dates: September 20, 2021 - September 20, 2021

Come out and show your passion and dedication in support of urban forests!

Urban forests celebrated by National Forest Week and Maple Leaf Day in September. Commemorations for trees and forests resonates with the City of Saskatoon strategic goal of environmental leadership, Green Infrastructure Strategy, Climate Action Plan, Low Emissions Community Plan, and the city’s official community plan. A celebration focus on forest heritage, culture, traditions, and history highlights the importance of trees, their essential ecological services. Trees support biodiversity and ecosystems, mitigate flooding, raise the water table, absorb carbon dioxide, and provide life saving oxygen. National Forest Week provides public support for the tree decisions made by Urban Forestry, Parks, Public Works, Long range planning. It’s a time for residents of the city to tell stories about their love of trees, and appreciation of forests, and how very blessed we are. The flag raising and proclamation are a reminder of our responsibilities, relationship and solidarity with trees and forests.

The purpose of the flag raising is a great way to show support for urban forests! Urban forestry, and sustainability YXE green infrastructure strategy are both of importance to the City of Saskatoon. The name of the flag to be raised is the National Forest Week flag. A formal ceremony is planned for this event.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" make_fullwidth="on" use_custom_width="on" width_unit="off" use_custom_gutter="off" padding_mobile="off" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" make_equal="off" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="off" parallax_2="off" parallax_method_2="off" column_padding_mobile="on" custom_width_percent="100%" custom_css_main_element="width: 100% !important;"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

The urban forest and climate change (Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.)

Category: Meetings, Conferences and Workshops
Dates: September 20, 2021 - September 20, 2021

Zoom online event. The health of trees is being affected by climate change but trees are also a necessary solution in mitigating it

Linda Moskalyk, President of SOS Trees Coalition, says, “Climate mitigation is one of the most important benefits that our trees provide.” This engaging session will bring together citizens from all walks of life who have a commitment to working on climate action. During National Forest Week, take time to reflect on nature based solutions to climate change. SOS Trees Inc. is partnering with the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc in regards to climate action.

“We forget that we owe our existence to the presence of Trees. As far as forest cover goes, we have never been in such a vulnerable position as we are today. The only answer is to plant more Trees – to Plant Trees for Our Lives," says Richard St. Barbe Baker

This program for National Forest Week is brought to you by the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas an environmental non-profit charity that was created to preserve and restore the 326-acre Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and the 148-acre George Genereux Urban Regional Park. Our work reinforces the 1972 City Council decision designating these afforestation areas on the western fringe of Saskatoon to “be preserved in perpetuity.” They are important habitat for wildlife as well as semi-wild public spaces for recreation and nature immersion. The larger of these two areas is named after Richard St. Barbe Baker (1889-1982), who has been called the “first global conservationist” and in recognition of this he was made the first Honorary Life Member of the World Wildlife Fund in 1969. A British forester who also homesteaded and studied in Saskatoon, he dedicated his entire life unfailingly to the preservation and planting of trees and forests.

This is one session in a week long series of events celebrating National Forest Week with a theme – “Our Forests – Continually Giving”

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" make_fullwidth="on" use_custom_width="on" width_unit="off" use_custom_gutter="off" padding_mobile="off" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" make_equal="off" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="off" parallax_2="off" parallax_method_2="off" column_padding_mobile="on" custom_width_percent="100%" custom_css_main_element="width: 100% !important;"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

Can you take a trip back in time? (Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.)

Category: Meetings, Conferences and Workshops
Dates: September 19, 2021 - September 19, 2021

Virtual Zoom meeting. Canadian CLS environmental education program explores historical time lines Find out about electron beam energy, environmental education, and the Canadian Light Source TREE program A webinar open toto everyone to learn about this programme, an introduction to the National Canada Wide TREE program where students from Grade 6 to 12 can meet with Dr Colin Laroque in the Mistik Askiwin Dendrochronology Lab (MAD Lab) to work with the Canadian Light Source (CLS) Synchrotron. What does the Canadian Light Source Synchrotron have to do with Trembling Aspens, and Climate Change? Tree ring patterns reveal lifestyles, climate history, and so much more! What kind of learning can be experienced peeking into the heart of trees?

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" make_fullwidth="on" use_custom_width="on" width_unit="off" use_custom_gutter="off" padding_mobile="off" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" make_equal="off" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="off" parallax_2="off" parallax_method_2="off" column_padding_mobile="on" custom_width_percent="100%" custom_css_main_element="width: 100% !important;"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

Saskatoon’s Wildlife—the real night life in Saskatoon! (Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.)

Category: Meetings, Conferences and Workshops
Dates: September 18, 2021 - September 18, 2021

Saskatoon’s trail cams reveal who’s who.
Dr .Ryan Brook has access to Saskatoon’s real night life. His Wildlife Ecology and Community Engagement (WECE) lab at the University of Saskatchewan uses 30 trail cameras strapped to trees to photograph the different animals that are coming and going in the city and on its fringes. Approximately 85% of the photographs in the first four months were of animals active at night. Our river corridor is a living habitat that's home to a lot species including coyotes, skunks, foxes, moose, deer, rabbits, porcupines, beavers, and muskrats, but there have been cougar and bear sightings.

The U of S project is part of the Urban Wildlife Information Network (UWIN), which has dozens of cities compiling and sharing similar data with each other. Saskatoon is one of the first Canadian cities involved in this alliance of urban wildlife scientists committed to doing the research necessary to enhance the ability for people and wildlife to coexist in cities. The WECE lab data will be invaluable to better understanding animal patterns in Saskatoon and could be used to shape wildlife policy and land use planning. The Saskatoon metropolitan area is anticipated to grow to ½ million people and there are important Green Network Study Areas in the works which are vital for ecological connections along the river and the associated northeast swale, small swale, Hudson Bay Swale and west swale which are all part of the South Saskatchewan watershed.

This program for National Forest Week is brought to you by the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas an environmental non-profit charity that was created to preserve and restore the 326-acre Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and the 148-acre George Genereux Urban Regional Park. Our work reinforces the 1972 City Council decision designating these afforestation areas on the western fringe of Saskatoon to “be preserved in perpetuity.” They are important habitat for wildlife as well as semi-wild public spaces for recreation and nature immersion. The larger of these two areas is named after Richard St. Barbe Baker (1889-1982), who has been called the “first global conservationist” and in recognition of this he was made the first Honorary Life Member of the World Wildlife Fund in 1969. A British forester who also homesteaded and studied in Saskatoon, he dedicated his entire life unfailingly to the preservation and planting of trees and forests.

As a member of the Indigenous Land Management Institute in the College of Agriculture and Bioresources, Brook combines traditional knowledge, wildlife ecology, ecosystem monitoring science and a wealth of data about wildlife movement and activities in Saskatoon. Join us on Saturday Sept. 18 at 7:00 pm as we discover what Brook’s lab has discovered and how we can better understand urban wildlife and the ecology around us. It is a great opportunity to increase our capacity to connect with and co-exist with our urban wildlife.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" make_fullwidth="on" use_custom_width="on" width_unit="off" use_custom_gutter="off" padding_mobile="off" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" make_equal="off" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="off" parallax_2="off" parallax_method_2="off" column_padding_mobile="on" custom_width_percent="100%" custom_css_main_element="width: 100% !important;"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

Saskatoon’s Wildlife—the real night life in Saskatoon! (Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.)

Category: Meetings, Conferences and Workshops
Dates: September 18, 2021 - September 18, 2021

Dr .Ryan Brook has access to Saskatoon’s real night life. His Wildlife Ecology and Community Engagement (WECE) lab at the University of Saskatchewan uses 30 trail cameras strapped to trees to photograph the different animals that are coming and going in the city and on its fringes. Approximately 85% of the photographs in the first four months were of animals active at night. Our river corridor is a living habitat that's home to a lot species including coyotes, skunks, foxes, moose, deer, rabbits, porcupines, beavers, and muskrats, but there have been cougar and bear sightings.

The U of S project is part of the Urban Wildlife Information Network (UWIN), which has dozens of cities compiling and sharing similar data with each other. Saskatoon is one of the first Canadian cities involved in this alliance of urban wildlife scientists committed to doing the research necessary to enhance the ability for people and wildlife to coexist in cities. The WECE lab data will be invaluable to better understanding animal patterns in Saskatoon and could be used to shape wildlife policy and land use planning. The Saskatoon metropolitan area is anticipated to grow to ½ million people and there are important Green Network Study Areas in the works which are vital for ecological connections along the river and the associated northeast swale, small swale, Hudson Bay Swale and west swale which are all part of the South Saskatchewan watershed.

This program for National Forest Week is brought to you by the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas an environmental non-profit charity that was created to preserve and restore the 326-acre Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and the 148-acre George Genereux Urban Regional Park. Our work reinforces the 1972 City Council decision designating these afforestation areas on the western fringe of Saskatoon to “be preserved in perpetuity.” They are important habitat for wildlife as well as semi-wild public spaces for recreation and nature immersion. The larger of these two areas is named after Richard St. Barbe Baker (1889-1982), who has been called the “first global conservationist” and in recognition of this he was made the first Honorary Life Member of the World Wildlife Fund in 1969. A British forester who also homesteaded and studied in Saskatoon, he dedicated his entire life unfailingly to the preservation and planting of trees and forests.

As a member of the Indigenous Land Management Institute in the College of Agriculture and Bioresources, Brook combines traditional knowledge, wildlife ecology, ecosystem monitoring science and a wealth of data about wildlife movement and activities in Saskatoon. Join us on Saturday Sept. 18 at 7:00 pm as we discover what Brook’s lab has discovered and how we can better understand urban wildlife and the ecology around us. It is a great opportunity to increase our capacity to connect with and co-exist with our urban wildlife.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" make_fullwidth="on" use_custom_width="on" width_unit="off" use_custom_gutter="off" padding_mobile="off" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" make_equal="off" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="off" parallax_2="off" parallax_method_2="off" column_padding_mobile="on" custom_width_percent="100%" custom_css_main_element="width: 100% !important;"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

Ovarian Cancer Canada Walk of Hope Saskatoon (Ovarian Cancer Canada)

Category: Fundraisers and Volunteer
Dates: September 8, 2019 - September 8, 2019

The Ovarian Cancer Canada Walk of Hope is the largest and most powerful event of its kind in the country. Held in over 35 communities nationwide, it is the only walk in Canada to direct all attention and fundraising towards helping women with ovarian cancer live fuller, better and longer lives.
Held annually during Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, this family-friendly event raises vital funds to change lives affected by ovarian cancer through research, advocacy, and support.
Register today for the Walk in Saskatoon on Sunday, September 8th, at Saskatoon Minor Football Field and join thousands of Canadians walking to save women’s lives. www.ovariancancerwalkofhope.ca

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" make_fullwidth="on" use_custom_width="on" width_unit="off" use_custom_gutter="off" padding_mobile="off" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" make_equal="off" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="off" parallax_2="off" parallax_method_2="off" column_padding_mobile="on" custom_width_percent="100%" custom_css_main_element="width: 100% !important;"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

Midtown Common Grand Opening (Midtown)

Category: Food and Drink
Dates: July 25, 2019 - July 28, 2019

Celebrate Midtown's brand new food hall, Midtown Common, on July 25! Visit its new location on the upper level to #FindSomethingInCommon and try new and familiar favs. Enjoy food, a live DJ, contests and promotions all weekend long!

Doorcrasher: Dine & Cash!

Be sure to arrive early as the first 200 guests in line on July 25 will get to “Dine & Cash!” — spend $10 at Midtown Common during the Grand Opening and win a Midtown gift card valued between $10 and $100.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row]

Unless we think of others and do something for them, we miss one of the greatest sources of happiness.
Ray Lyman Wilbur